Paintings and process

Good Advice for Wildlife Artists

Personally, I have found that learning from good teachers is a great time-saver. What could take years of trial and error can maybe be addressed in an hour and then you get to move on to the next challenge.

In that spirit of benefiting from those who have gone before, here’s some thoughts about the making of wildlife art that I find worthwhile, illustrated with a few of the reference photos I’ve shot through the years.

KEN CARLSON:

“One of the challenges of painting a number of animals, particularly pronghorns, is to design an interesting grouping. What I try to achieve is an appealing overall shape; an uncontrived, natural look to the grouping…”

National Bison Reserve pronghorns; this one has possibilities

National Bison Reserve pronghorns; this has possibilities, but the "grouping" needs a lot of work

BOB KUHN:

“…the need to convey those gestures, poses and attitudes that spell out the character unique to the animal.”

Lake Nakuru cape buffalo; typical "I dare you"

Lake Nakuru cape buffalo; typical "I dare you". The painting I used this reference for will be on my website by the end of November

GUY COHOLEACH:

“You look into the eyes of a leopard in a zoo, and sure, you can get a lot out of them. But look into the eyes of a lion 30 feet away from you, when you’re standing right in front of him with no rifle, and let me tell you, they look a lot different. They do.”

Masai Mara lion; I was in a car, but still...

Masai Mara lion; I was in a car, but still...(Actually, he's flamen. There was a more dominant lion nearby who was with a lioness.)

NICHOLAS HAMMOND author of Modern Wildlife Painting:

“The best of modern wildlife painters show us the mystery and death, memory and beauty and what is to be learned, or lamented, loved or wept for.”

And it helps to have an assistant

And it helps to have an assistant

Happy Hallowe’en!

And Samhain, too!

And Samhain, too!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s